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20130121
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
started it in 2007 with harry reid to block george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct. and in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers that this is presidential power. the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. and they are undermining. >> that is really not in dispute. what is in dispute here is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate or the president? >> and i think the oath -- you also have to put this in broader context. >> things got done during that -- >> they weren't in town. they weren't in town. you could not consider a nomination because they weren't here. >> the thing about this, though, put it in broader context. the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing this way, way back and saying in fact if you look at the constitution you can't even if you are a president hold out the recess appointments and then make them finally put them forward when the senate is in recess. the recess has to happ
of the george w. bush administration. this brings me to another critically important part of our book, which is how the islamic republic of iran has become the biggest that issue of american mistakes and are ongoing decline in the middle east. in our book, we lay out how by pursuing a foreign policy and building a domestic political order that attracts publics, the islamic republic of iran has been able to take an impeach of american mistakes, to improve its own position dramatically. the key to the islamic republic successes has been that beyond the shift in the distribution of power, who has power in the middle east is a detailed earlier, something even more important is happening and that is the middle east will power itself is changing. it is now increasingly less defined by hard military capabilities for the united states has a clear advantage in the islamic republic of iran is relatively positioned and more defined in terms of the balance of influence are the islamic republic of iran has real unique advantages. as we explained in our book, the islamic republic is encouraging and taken
not just idiosyncratic, ideologically-generated products of the george w. bush administration. as we describe in our book, these stem from a much deeper source that cuts across both democratic and republican administrations, and it's something we describe as the united states, essentially, giving in to a post-cold war temptation to act as an imperial power in the middle east. and it is this imperial turn in america's middle east policies pursued with very little regard for realities on the ground in the middle east that have proven not just quixotic, but deeply damaging to american interests. as a candidate back in twaipt, now-president obama then seemed to really understand this. he talked about it courageously during the campaign. he pledged to not just withdraw american troops from iraq, but to change what he called the american mindset that had gotten us into the strategic mistake of invading iraq in the first place. he pledged to really change america's middle east policies. but instead the obama administration has pursued the same sorts of policies as its predecessors, the same
: the democrats. >> no, democrats -- >> democrats started it in 2007 with harry reid, blocking george w. bush. george w. bush never challenged this. >> correct and, in fact, george w. bush's lawyers wrote recently in the newspapers, that this is presidential power, the constitution gives the president the power to make recess appointments. >> chris: juan, i want to -- >> that is not in dispute. what is in dispute here, is whether the senate was actually in recess and the question comes, who gets to decide whether the senate is in recess? the senate? or the president? >> a sham... >> and, in the broader context, there are things -- >> -- things done during that -- >> they weren't in town, they could not consider the nomination because they were not here. >> but it in broader context, the more interesting aspect of the ruling was them dialing it way, way back and saying, in fact if you look at the constitution, you can't even, if you are a president, hold out the recess appointments, and, then make them finally put them forward when senate is in recess. the recess actually has to happen while t
$500 bonus cash. ♪ >>> graph time. during the george w. bush administration, government spending went up a lot. this is government expenditures per capita, per american person. it combines federal, and state and local governments, right? as you can see, it start there's when george w. bush took office in 2001, and it wasn't like there was just some individual spike in spending that happened right after 9/11. it was a steady, huge increase over time. so per capita government spending was roughly 12 grand per person when w. came into office. when he left office, it wasn't 12 grand anymore, it was 16 grand in government spending for every man, woman and child in the country. that is a big, steep increase. for comparison sake, if you look at bill clinton, who was in office for the same amount of time, bill clinton also saw a spending rise, but compared to dubbia, he kept spending under control. it really takes off, as you can see, when it goes to bush. since president obama has been in office, he has been better than both of them. he hasn't just held the reins, like clinton did, he has tu
president, and george w. bush was a guy who thought deeply about imuation reform, poverty and trying to craft a middle class agenda for the gop. george w. bush is a figure that many republicans have been running away from. so tell me, do you think republicans were too quick to abandon george w. bush? >> i'm sorry, what? i was tweeting. i'm sorry. [laughter] um, well, yes and no. i think, obviously, politically republicans distanced themselves from george w. bush because it was politic thing to do. numbers don't lie. he became very unpopular. parties tend not to embrace figures and politicians who become unpopular. my view is that a lot of the distress over bush's domestic agenda from which republicans fled beginning really in 2005 had, it was a, it was an ancillary result of the failure to secure victory in iraq early and to have a favorable reckoning -- >> so iraq sank what might have been a successful domestic policy agenda? >> right. well, what i mean is that i think the entire country stopped listening to president bush on what would be efficacious for the country when it lost fa
military and their families. it is a tradition that was started under president george w. bush. they have expand it this year to be larger than it has ever been. it's essentially doubled in size. there are two official inaugural balls, two only in washington tonight. one of them is the commander in chief ball. and the other of them is the other official inaugural ball. thanks for being with us on what is kind of a big day in washington. you know the basics of what happened today. church service at st. john's house near the white house. the president goes from the white house then to the capitol, then he is sworn in at the capitol on the west front. and that is the spot from which president obama today delivered his second inaugural address. well will have much more on all of that coming up this hour. but here is the moment from today. the moment that i want to show you was not part of the official program. it was not on anybody's schedule. we did not know it was coming, and it was not spoken into any microphone. so i'm just going to play this for you for a second. but notice it's going to
. this is something new. after president george w. bush won reelection in 2004, he did not have an entire campaign structure at the ready, millions of supporters strong mobilizing behind him and raising money for him to achieve his second term goals. president clinton didn't have anything like that when he was elected to a second term. no president has had an independent group do that. but barack obama now has that. his election campaign has been turned into an independent group. the chairman of the new group will be a man named jim messina. he is not exactly a political lightweight. his last job was in fact running president obama's 2012 reelection campaign. to have jim messina in charge of this thing means this is not a place where emeritus your friends to keep them on the payroll. this is something that is going to be an active operation with some of the biggest guns in politics at the helm of it. democrats are turning their brightest lights from the two successful campaigns of this president into a political operation that will operate throughout president obama's second term. nobody has any i
. iraqi weapons of mass destruction. >> john: scare yes words the george w. bush administration never apologized for which no one ever take responsibility for which didn't stop rand paul trying to make secretary hillary clinton personally responsible for benghazi when the board cleared her. >> i'm glad you're accepting responsibility. i think that all thely with your leaving you accept the culpability for the worst tragedy since 9/11 i really mean that. had i been president at the time and i found that you did not read the cables from benghazi, you did not read the cables from ambassador stevens, i would have relieved you of your post. i think it's inexcuse cuesible. >> john: that's rand paul getting his in for 2016. i'm thrilled to be joined by tj crowley. thank you so much for joining us this evening. >> a through, john. >> john: i want to get your take on this. did these hearings seem to be more about what happened in four years than what happened in benghazi last fall? >> it's a mix. certainly as your clip showed, some senators and some representatives who just haven't got past se
they have been there already. it's called george w. bush america. it has two unfunded wars, depression and ongoing effort to divide americans over wage issues. it leads to secure a presidential win in 2016 by changing the rules of the electoral college. now under the old rules the candidate who wins the popular votes gets all of the state's electoral votes. which is how president obama beat mitt romney handily 332- 332-206. but under the new rules presidential candidates would split the electoral college votes based on which congressional districts they won with two additional electoral votes going to the winner of the popular vote. so if those rules had been in effect last year, president obama would have lost to governor romney 262-273. nice thinking. right now those rules are in effect in two states maine and nebraska. but g.o.p. legislation in michigan pennsylvania and virginia are also considering making the change. the g.o.p. also isn't backing down on its effort to restrict access to the ballot box by potential democratic voters wherever it can. so the democratic legislators in
party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker who is doing really well up in wisconsin. and all the republicans got up there, and they were saying the same thing. we've got to stop being the stupid party. we've been saying here for six months, we have got to -- and john, i thought, had one of the best points, that we have stifled debate. the conservative movement has stifled debate. and if you go out and you dare to stand out in a crowd, whether it's on taxes or regulations or in the past on immigration, you were completely shunned from the party. finally there's an understanding we've got to grow the party. what we've been saying for quite frankly for years and getting at
's name was george w. bush. there is a lot of hypocrisy going on in washington, which i'm sure you're not surprised by it. michael hastings is not only writing for rolling stone and buzzfeed but author of the "sublime and inside story of obama's final campaign." he's also a correspondent here at "the young turks." of course, lindsay moran former clandestine officer for the i c.i.a. great to have you here. let me start with you michael were you surprised at the severity of the republicans response to clinton? >> no. they decided this was going to be an issue that they were going to ride as far as they could. they already got one scalp with susan rice preventing her from becoming secretary of state and including trying to tarnish secretary clinton's image. that first question that secretary clinton we just heard who was asked by the senator that was off base. clinton is right. whether it was a spontaneous demonstration or a planned attack or some sort of combination of both, which is from my understands that that is the case, it's fairly irrelevant. that's the wrong question. rand pa
by then president george w. bush. we're joined by our panel. we were talking about before climate change. how much can the president really do? what do you see him doing given him wanting to make efforts on gun control on the budget? on the deficit? >> let me say two things that he can do. i got interrupted for miss alicia keys. i'm sorry. >> today is an incredible day. and you can feel the energy everywhere that you go. in so many ways, every day is a new day. and a new chance. a new chance to be our best. to serve our highest purpose. yeah. so i'm going to need your help tonight because i'm up here all by myself. i just wanted it to be me and you. so help me celebrate this most momentous day. i'll tell you what to do. i need you to say -- ♪ ♪ people say eh ♪ ♪ it's a new day ♪ it's a new day ♪ getting ready, everybody ready ♪ ♪ eh oh, a new day ♪ a new day ♪ celebrate and say eh, eh ♪ celebrate and say eh ♪ yeah because he's president and he's on fire. hotter than a fab as they like a highway ♪ ♪ he's living in a world and it's on fire filled with catastrophe ♪ ♪
a relief it is! >>> welcome back. josh trevino former speechwriter in the george w. bush administration and now at the texas public policy foundation and ambassador swanee hunt who served as u.s. ambassador to austria, now a lecturer at harvard's kennedy school of government. we have just been talking as you saw in a very heated fashion about the situation in north africa and i think that's one core part of the legacy of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an in
presence put together by jim baker and george h. w. bush and the success in the engagement of it. but subsequent to that, we have seen a completely different scene. that is what i would describe as three alarmers and two alarmers. we about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world within all of a sudden you have people who don't have the -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference have basically come to the conclusion that the world has changed and we can't afford nor do we have the public support for global open gaugement. -- engagement. when you talk to people back home and you say why do we give so much foreign aid? it is literally like saying, you know, you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and you get a haircut and solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid and presence now is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insignificant compared to it. but yet the will to support that going forward and even step out and say well we ought to be more engaged here or do more here or these are the functions that are working. it's
with us. >> thank you. >> former president george w. bush and his father, former president george h.w. bush, aren't attending this inaugural. president -- former president bill clinton and jimmy carter are. we are waiting to see president clinton. stand by for that. also taking a closer look at the downside of winning another four years of the white house. it doesn't always go so well. the second-term curse, as some call it. that's coming up as well. first, though, inaugural flashback. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> we all remember the phrase the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. but even more important than the phrase was the whole attitude that fdr had. he projected optimism and projected forward movement. people felt that's the mystery of leadership, that somehow the depression they were suffering, they weren't going to be alone anymore. they had a leader who was going to take care of it. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they h
and that the united states is not engaged. >> look at george w. bush. in 2000 he said he would have a restrained, humble foreign policy. then 9/11 hit. and now we've been dealing with wars for over a decade. we have already made reference to it while the chinese have been investing in africa. we've been dropping bombs in iraq. we are now in afghanistan. 12 years in. $2 billion a week. our defense budget keeps exploding. so an iranian crisis comes at the absolute worst time for this country. >> that's what i was saying early on. >> on so many points. >> things could change dramatically this year. >> richard and i have talked about this a lot. in search of a metaphor, have i been thinking about the islamic role in africa and the middle east, think of it size a large, very dry forest after years of drought. and a lightning strike anywhere, which is unanticipated, starts a brush fire. and then it goes across. we just saw what happened in algeria. what's going on in syria at the moment. and we are not dealing state-to-state. there's an entirely new set of rules for dealing with that critical part of
know, barack obama is no more responsible for what happened in benghazi than george w. bush was for what happened on september 11th, 2001 or ronald reagan when the marines got blown up in beirut. these are terrible tragedies and what we have to do is come together as a people to find out what happened and to make sure that nothing like this ever happens again. and that to me is the real purpose of secretary clinton testifying because we really want to make sure that this doesn't happen again. this should not be used for political gotchas but americans need to band together at times of national tragedy. we lost our ambassador and other americans and we want to make sure as the secretary has said we need to move forward to take steps to make sure this doesn't happen again. she's agreed to accept this plan, these points, 29 points, this was a high-powered thing, wasn't any kind of cover-up or washed over. this is very distinguished, mr. pickering and adds miral mullen had good recommendations and they should be implemented as soon as possible so there are no future benghazis. >
george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think
is feeling good. >> remember, george w. bush was the same way. he came up and had a little bit more swagger after he was re-elected. i think that's what you get in the first couple of months before you start digging into the muck. >> given the climate in washington and what he has faced many his first term. >> he seems to be enjoying this job in a way he hadn't before. he came into a second term thinking that the fever would break in washington. the sort of tea party revolution that had taken over, and in some ways he seems to be right. if you look at what happened with the fiscal cliff, if you look at some of the filibuster reform. >> debt ceiling. >> the debt ceiling stuff. it seems like this is a city that he gets -- he is more of an insider in washington than he was four years ago. i will say about the denis mcdonough appointment, it's good to finally see a white guy get a top job. it's really -- they've been shut out. >> they gave him a chance. >> thanks god. >> there's a reason why this was held up. the president jokes about saying it's the best kept secret in washington. we've all kn
going through what happened with president george w. bush with the iraq war and president clinton with his personal indiscretion with 3407b monica lieu win aewinskylewinsk. why have presidents struggled so much in a second term? >> i think we have to look at the percentages, erin. to get to the second term you probably did pretty well in your first term, right? over the course of eight years it's not that unusual for a president to stupble or have a problem. so i think we've got to look at presidents over the whole eight years and get away from this second term curse. >> familiarity does breed contempt. we're not on too much. george washington had a lousy second term relatively speaking. he was the father of his country. no parties, unanimous choice of the american people. we don't like to talk about it, but people were taking a lot of potshots at him in the second term because that's when the jeffersonian republican party emerged. it was a tough time. he wanted to quit after his first term. they wouldn't let him, and he was sorry he hadn't. >> and they just throw things at him. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)